The Wolf Among Us

The Wolf Among Us title screen
Copyright Telltale Games.

A One-Page Review Game Review

The Wolf Among Us is the first Telltale game I have played. Their games are a modern form of the old point-and-click variety, a genre that I enjoyed in my younger years. I was a huge fan of LucasArts. But one thing that Telltale brings to the table is choices that affect the story. So, when I interact with characters or choose to investigate certain places over others, the story alters based on my choices.

TWAU is set in the Fables comics universe that was created by Bill Willingham. I was a huge fan of this series. In the game, you take control of Bigby Wolf, the sheriff of Fabletown. Bigby investigates the murder of a prostitute named Faith. What is particularly interesting in this game is the exploration of the seedy side of Fabletown and learning about Fables that fell between the cracks. Not everyone was a prince or princess. Some Fables were trolls or woodsmen or Grendel. A mysterious man known only as the Crooked Man has started an organization that provides for, and controls, Fables that can’t afford the Fabletown services—in particular, those that can’t afford the glamors that allow them to pass as human so they don’t have to go to the Farm.

Basically, TWAU is a noir exploration of the seedy underbelly of the Fables’s world.

Bigby gives Collin a cigarette.
Copyright Telltale games

For the most part, I enjoyed the game. I liked how Telltale introduced new characters who were based on urban myths, such as Bloody Mary and The Jersey Devil. I loved when Bigby finally tuned into his full, Big Bad Wolf form. And there were plenty of moments when I agonized over decisions I had to make. But at times I didn’t find the game too engaging. I would have enjoyed just watching and not playing, or even reading the story if it was a comic. Sometimes I forgot I was playing a game, and realized I had to answer a question or dodge a punch. (Be warned: don’t ever let your hands drop off the keyboard, just in case.)

Overall, I wanted more gameplay and exploration. The Wolf Among Us, however, is a well-made game, and a well-told story. It just wasn’t quite my thing.

Final Rating: 7/10

Assassin’s Creed Chronicles: China

Assassin's Creed Chronicles China title screen
Title screen. Copyright Ubisoft.

A one-page game review.

So, maybe a game this late in the series wasn’t the best starting point. I’ve played a few minutes of Assassin’s Creed, but I’ve never finished it. I’ve barely started it. I love what I’ve seen so far, especially the visuals, but there are a lot of control combinations, and I wanted to wait for a time when I’m not trying to get through quite a few other games.

Why start ACC:C, then? I wanted something different, and this game was different than anything else I was currently playing. I grew up on the NES and the SNES, so I’m familiar with old-school platforming (back when we called it “side-scrolling”). I cut my teeth on Mega Man 2 and Ninja Gaiden. I thought ACC:C looked like an interesting update to the platforming games of old, and I like learning about Southeast Asian history. If there was an Assassin’s Creed game set in Edo Japan, I’d be dropping everything to play it.

The game takes place in China in 1526 and follows Shao Jun, the remaining assassin of the Chinese brotherhood. Templars wiped out her fellow assassins. The extent of my Assassin’s Creed knowledge is that the Assassins and the Templars are enemies. (And that there’s a sci-fi element with the animus and recovered memories or something that, at a distance, seems unnecessarily complicated. Maybe I’ll like it when I eventually try out the main series.) Anyway, Shao Jun allows herself to be captured so she can get revenge against the Templars. That’s pretty much it for the plot. The story was a bit underwhelming.

Example of a level in Assassin's Creed Chronicles China.
Copyright Ubisoft.

There is some good platforming in this game, and the level design is very interesting. In particular, I love that there are different layers to the levels, which means you can occasionally run toward the camera or away from it to find alternate paths. This gives the game a 3D element that occasionally added alternate paths. I also enjoyed the UX design. The game used splashes of red to show where you could alter your path or interact with objects. Green often designated places you could hide; red showed places you could climb. Avoiding guards was sometimes very difficult, and combat could be excruciating. But I think what I enjoyed the most were the levels where you had to outrun fires that broke out. It was fun trying to navigate the levels as fast as possible, and even more fun when I unlocked the jump/sliding kill moves.  In my first time through these levels, I almost hit the best speed run score, usually missing it by a few seconds. It felt good to get that close on my first try, making me feel that all those old gaming muscles were still there, waiting to be tapped. (It felt annoying to get that close, but miss.)

There are a lot of controls to remember, and I confess that my play style was a combination of impatience and forgetfulness. When I played Dishonored, I did a stealth run, and didn’t kill anyone. In ACC:C, I got impatient and killed as many guards as I could. I got tired of dealing with them. Maybe if I remembered the combos, I would have done better. I probably would have fared better with a controller, but I was using my PC and was feeling too lazy and disinterested to try to figure it out.

So, I guess that is my final verdict. Good visual and level design, but kind of uninteresting and not very engaging from a plot standpoint. But the speed run sections are a lot of fun.

Final Rating: 6/10

Silence

A One-Page Review of the novel by Shusaku Endo

Sin, he reflected, is not what it is usually thought to be; it is not to steal and tell lies. Sin is for one man to walk brutally over the life of another and to be quite oblivious to the wounds he has left behind.

Cover for Silence.
Silence. Ed. 2016. Published by Picador Modern Classics.

Silence is a Japanese historical novel set in the 17th century. Japan has closed its borders to all but Dutch traders. The country is closed to Christian missionaries. The new magistrate, Inoue, has led a successful campaign of persecution against Christians, causing many to apostatize—including the highly respected Father Ferreira. Two of Ferreira’s formers students, Fathers Rodrigues and Garrpe, decide to go to Japan to discover the truth of Ferreira’s fate and to minister to the hidden Christians.

The novel is told from multiple perspectives: Rodrigues’s letters, third-person, journals from a Dutch trader, and government documents. Each section increases the distance between the reader and Rodrigues.

The major theme of this book is the struggle to maintain faith while God is silent. Rodrigues witnesses horrific tortures that are not designed to kill, but to cause apostasy. In particular, if priests apostatize, it shows the inferiority of the Christian faith when compared to Japanese culture. Through his novel, Endo attempts to wrestle with why Christianity has had difficulty taking root in Japan. But he also challenges the missionary perspective of Rodrigues and the concept of what a faithful Christian looks like. He introduces the idea that Rodriguez couldn’t truly hear God in this situation until his understanding of Christianity had been challenged and stripped away.

This is a brilliant work of art that asks hard questions about faith and suffering.

Verdict: Highly recommended for fans of historical fiction, Japanese culture, and thoughtful contemplation about faith. The edition I read had an introduction that explained the historical context of the story. The descriptions of the persecutions are very unpleasant, but the novel itself doesn’t go in to as much detail about the specifics.

One Page Review: Bastion

A one-page review is a short review that I write by hand on a single page. Once I get to the end of the page, I end the review, polish it up, and post it.

Bastion title screen
Image copyright: Supergiant Games, 2011.

Bastion was the first game developed by Supergiant Games. You play as The Kid, who awakens to find his city, Caelondia, destroyed by the Calamity. The game is an action RPG on an isometric grid. You make your way to the Bastion, the place where survivors are supposed to gather in case of emergency. If the Kid can collect the Cores from the ruins of Caelondia, he can restore the city. Along the way, he discovers additional survivors, including Rucks, the narrator; Zulf, an ambassador from Ura; and Zia, a Uran raised in Caelondia.

The visual design is beautiful. Each level is meticulously detailed. Pieces of the stage appear as you walk. The music is wonderful and truly adds to the world building. The gameplay is easy to pick up, but the isometric map can make targeting difficult. And late in the game there is a platforming section that can be a pain to navigate due to the layout. But for the most part, the perspective works and allows you to see an amazing amount of details.

The Kid returns to Bastion to talk to Rucks.
Image copyright: Supergiant Games, 2011.

The game has a surprisingly deep characterization and story. A new game plus mode opens up new gameplay options, so even after you beat the main game (which I did in about 8 hours) there are plenty of challenges to keep you busy. And the game gives you some choices late in the game that affect the ending.

All in all, if you are looking for a unique action RPG with great designs, amazing music, and dry sense of humor, check this one out.

Verdict: Highly Recommended for action RPG fans.