Final Fantasy 4 (Final Fantasy Playthrough)

Final fantasy 4 title screen
Final Fantasy 4 title screen. Copyright Square-Enix.

Original Release Date: 1991

Playthrough Platform: PC (From the Nintendo DS port)

My History with the Game: Final Fantasy IV is the game that made me a fan of the series. While I had played FFI on the NES, it was the SNES version of FFIV (known to me back then as FFII) that captured my imagination. Outside of The Legend of Zelda, no game series had a greater impact on me as a gamer. I couldn’t purchase a copy of the game back then, so I rented Final Fantasy IV from the local video store, while desperately hoping that no one overwrote my save file as I tried to scrounge more money to rent the game again. I think I played it through twice. I have since learned that the version I grew up with was an easier version, though back then, I thought it was plenty hard. In the mid-2000s, I picked up the PS One re-release of the game, which included the original difficulty. I completed that version at least once. This playthrough is my first time to play the DS version.

Play Time for Main Story: 26:11

Story

The Kingdom of Baron has begun to aggressively pursue the elemental crystals of other nations. The Dark Knight Cecil leads Baron’s air force, The Red Wings, against the city of Mysidia. Despite being mages, the Mysidians do not fight back. Many are killed. In light of this unprovoked slaughter, Cecil begins to question his king. He is exiled. Final Fantasy IV follows Cecil’s quest to learn why Baron is stealing the crystals and to stop the evil forces behind it.

Image of Baron Castle
Baron Castle. Copyright Square Enix

Much like Final Fantasy II, narrative takes center stage in this game. However, objectives are much clearer, and character stories drive many plot points. The story is filled with victory, tragedy, betrayal, and revelations. It is the most cohesive game so far in the series, and the one hints at the story-driven progression of future games.

Characters

The characters are diverse and memorable. Cecil is the conflicted knight who questions his king, though it grieves him to do so. Kain is Cecil’s childhood friend and the commander of Baron’s dragoons. Kain harbors a secret love for Rosa, Cecil’s lover. Rosa is a white mage who wants to accompany Cecil in his quest. Rydia is a young girl from the summoner village. Her people are killed when Cecil and Kain unknowingly deliver fire monsters to the village. And there are many more characters (Cid, Tellah, Edward, Yang, Palom, Porom, Edge, Golbez, FoSuYa), each with a distinct personality, backstory, and motivation. I particularly enjoyed that this version of the game included a playable cutscene of Golbez’s past. I think I would have liked to see more added scenes to flesh out additional characters, but the one with Golbez was nice. It humanized him and made him far more sympathetic.

Yang shakes hands with Cecil as Rosa watches.
Yang, Cecil, Rosa. Copyright Square-Enix

I do think that the game cheats a bit with character death. There are many points during which characters make a sacrifice. This is reminiscent of Final Fantasy 2. Unlike that game, however, many characters return near the end of the game. Their death scenes feel empty as a result.

I would have also liked more development for Rosa. She remains a damsel in distress for much of the game. Rydia became a far more compelling and developed female character. But again, the character development in this game is a huge step forward. The SNES cartridges allowed for more text and story content for the games, and I’m glad the developers focused on story and character.

Presentation

Playing the 3D version of this game took some adjustment. I was used to the SNES version. They didn’t change any maps, which was appreciated. And I loved the addition of a cartography quest for each dungeon. It inspired exploration and additional level grinding. The designers attempted to re-create the environments of the original, and I think they largely succeeded. I particularly enjoyed the embers from lava that drifted throughout the underworld.

This version of the game adds voiced cut-scenes. Some of the voices are cheesy, though the animation style almost justifies the lighter, silly anime tone of some scenes. The cut-scenes and 3D presentation allowed the animators to convey emotion better than the 2D sprites could in the original.

Tellah calls Edward a spoony bard.
I’m glad they didn’t change this classic line. Copyright Square-Enix.

Most of the music sounds good in this version. I think I enjoy the remake version of “Welcome to Our Town” better than the original. However, I prefer the original SNES versions of “Troian Beauty,” “Dancing Calbrena,” and “The Final Battle.”

Overall, the remake captures the feel and story of the original. Almost nothing is lost in the translation.

Gameplay

Character progression is far more simplified in this game when compared to Final Fantasy 2 and 3. We return to the XP/Leveling system of Final Fantasy I. Characters are locked into a single class, but there is variety since each character has one or two commands that are unique to their class. Since you are not able to choose who is in your party, each time you gain or lose members, you have to find a new dynamic for battle, which keeps you on your toes. The DS remake adds a bit of customization with augments, which allow you to give a character additional commands or abilities for battle. Augments were not part of the original game, so these serve to make combat a bit easier.

There are a few side-quests (additional eidolons for summoning, unique weapons, and achievements), but most of the game focuses on the main story. Gameplay supplements the story, so if you are looking for a game with a lot of customization or exploration, Final Fantasy IV probably isn’t what you are looking for. I think that is a tension that the series always fights with: openness vs. driving narrative. Some games find a decent balance. Some lean more heavily toward one over the other. And some games jump back and forth, which can really mess with the pacing. Final Fantasy IV is very story/character driven, which is one reason I consistently enjoy it.

Dancing Dwarf
One side quest involves watching dancers in each town. Most are far more risque in this version than Nintendo allowed in the original. Here’s a dancing dwarf. Copyright Square-Enix.

Personal Enjoyment

Again, this is the game that made me a fan of the series. I think it is also the game that made me interested in fantasy as a genre. I enjoy the characters, the twists, and the music. The 3D remake allowed me to rediscover an old favorite with new eyes. If you are looking to experience one of the older Final Fantasy games, but have been turned off by the old 8 or 16-bit graphics, this remake is a great starting point.

Final Rating: 8.5/10

The end screen for the game.
End screen. Copyright Square-Enix

So, I’ve gushed about this game, and I’m glad it held up for me. But I’d like to know what you think. When did you first play Final Fantasy IV (any version)? Do you have a version that you prefer? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments.

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Final Fantasy 3 (Final Fantasy Playthrough)

Original Release Date: 1990

Playthrough Platform: PC

My History with the Game: This is the first time I have played this game.

Play Time for Main Story: 26:16

Music link to accompany reading.

20170526155324_1
Title screen. Copyright Square Enix.

Overview

Final Fantasy 3 was the last FF game released for the NES. It did not see a North American release until 2006, at which time it was released on the Nintendo DS (which I do not own), and was a 3D remake. This version was later ported to PC. Based on the research I have done, the story for the remake is largely the same as the original, though some characters have been fleshed out (rather than being generic) and a few mechanics have been tweaked.

Story

After a massive earthquake, four young orphans are chosen by the Crystals to be the Warriors of Light. In their travels they discover a world lurking beneath the Floating Continent that was their home. This world was frozen in time as the fallen wizard Xande works to achieve immortality. What Xande doesn’t realize is that he is a pawn in the struggle between Dark and Light. The balance between Dark and Light has shifted toward Dark, and the Warriors of Light must restore the balance. However, it turns out this quest was set into motion 1000 years earlier when the Warriors of Dark, while attempting to resolve the Light imbalance, encountered a creature they couldn’t destroy: The Cloud of Darkness, a creature whose sole desire is to return all existence to the Void. The Warriors of Dark were only able to contain the Cloud, but the Warriors of Light must now push back the Cloud of Darkness once and for all.

cloud-of-darkness
Cloud of Darkness. Copyright Square Enix.

One thing that continues to change in the Final Fantasy games is that the story becomes stronger and more prominent with each version. This game is no exception. While there are plenty of opportunities for grinding and exploration, the plot drives everything, and the next plot point is usually clear. But of particular interest is that level of Japanese cosmology that is in this game. When I first learned of the Warriors of Light and Dark who are called to preserve the balance between light and dark, I couldn’t help but imagine the Yin/Yang. Rather than the evil tyranny of FF2, you work to restore balance between Light and Dark, neutral forces that are only good or evil depending on their state of balance. The actions of humans affect the balance. And when imbalance occurs, the Void grows stronger. In the end, the Void is the enemy; non-existence is the enemy. Hope is the only way to fight the imbalance.

Characters

The characters were much stronger in this game. The main characters are

  • Arc – a bookish, somewhat timid young man
  • Ingus – a stoic royal guard
  • Refia – an adventurous young woman who doesn’t want to follow in her father’s footsteps as a blacksmith
  • Luneth – the least developed character. I think he may be intended to stand in for the player, and thus left vague on purpose.
Amano_FFIII_Group
Main cast. Copyright Square Enix.

The secondary characters are also memorable. Among them are

  • Sara – the princess who takes is on herself to re-imprison the djinn. (She is also in love with Ingus.)
  • Desch – a womanizer with amnesia
  • Prince Allus of Saronia – who was exiled by his father but now wants to return.

The only criticism I have with character is that, like Final Fantasy 2, the main villain is underdeveloped. We hear about him in a couple of place, but only truly see him at the end of the game. Even then, he is a pawn of a greater evil that we don’t meet until the very end of the game. However, this is a recurring Final Fantasy trope. This wasn’t the first time this happened, and it won’t be the last.

Presentation

I didn’t play the original NES version, so I can’t really judge that one. The PC port of the Nintendo DS version is a good looking game. The visuals fit the tone of the game, being vaguely anime and cartoonish in tone. The 3D battlegrounds are reminiscent of the Playstation One games. The level designs are great and there aren’t as many dead-ends or empty rooms. And this is the first time the Final Fantasy series utilizes multiple world maps, one for the floating continent and one for the lower world (and an underwater map).

dance-number
Dance Break. Copyright Square Enix.

And again . . . great music.

Gameplay

Thankfully, the character leveling system of FF2 is gone. We are back to a more traditional XP system for character leveling. To spice things up, FF3 adds the job system. This system is a different spin on character classes. Rather than selecting a class at the beginning of the game and sticking with it, you collect job crystals that allow you to change classes whenever you want. Each job provides stat bonuses that stick with you as long as the job is equipped. As you level up your jobs, the bonuses increase as well. Each job usually has one or two special abilities, such as magic, stealing, guarding, etc.) Changing jobs lets you vary your play style, and even provides strategic advantages since some jobs are better suited for areas or bosses. The only frustrating thing about jobs in this game is the penalty you suffer when switching jobs. You typically have to fight a few battles before the stat bonuses kick in. Since you can level all jobs to 99, this is a very grind-heavy game if you want to be a completionist, but it isn’t required.

victory
Victory is victory. Copyright Square Enix.

Personal Enjoyment

After the disappointment of Final Fantasy 2, this game was a blast. While I haven’t enjoyed the job system in the past, I enjoyed it here. The humor and cuteness of the game was surprisingly appealing to me.

FF3-Toads
Bad news . . . Copyright Square Enix.

Grinding was actually fun, though at times combat could be frustrating. Early on the difficulty levels seemed to spike heavily if I wasn’t keeping my job levels high. And the complete lack of tents and ethers was incredibly frustrating. I spent a lot of time going between dungeons and towns to keep my MP high. Thankfully, you get a few different types of airships here. So, in all, this was a lot of fun, and I can see myself returning to my saved game to keep building my job levels.

Final Rating: 8/10