Assassin’s Creed Chronicles: China

Assassin's Creed Chronicles China title screen
Title screen. Copyright Ubisoft.

A one-page game review.

So, maybe a game this late in the series wasn’t the best starting point. I’ve played a few minutes of Assassin’s Creed, but I’ve never finished it. I’ve barely started it. I love what I’ve seen so far, especially the visuals, but there are a lot of control combinations, and I wanted to wait for a time when I’m not trying to get through quite a few other games.

Why start ACC:C, then? I wanted something different, and this game was different than anything else I was currently playing. I grew up on the NES and the SNES, so I’m familiar with old-school platforming (back when we called it “side-scrolling”). I cut my teeth on Mega Man 2 and Ninja Gaiden. I thought ACC:C looked like an interesting update to the platforming games of old, and I like learning about Southeast Asian history. If there was an Assassin’s Creed game set in Edo Japan, I’d be dropping everything to play it.

The game takes place in China in 1526 and follows Shao Jun, the remaining assassin of the Chinese brotherhood. Templars wiped out her fellow assassins. The extent of my Assassin’s Creed knowledge is that the Assassins and the Templars are enemies. (And that there’s a sci-fi element with the animus and recovered memories or something that, at a distance, seems unnecessarily complicated. Maybe I’ll like it when I eventually try out the main series.) Anyway, Shao Jun allows herself to be captured so she can get revenge against the Templars. That’s pretty much it for the plot. The story was a bit underwhelming.

Example of a level in Assassin's Creed Chronicles China.
Copyright Ubisoft.

There is some good platforming in this game, and the level design is very interesting. In particular, I love that there are different layers to the levels, which means you can occasionally run toward the camera or away from it to find alternate paths. This gives the game a 3D element that occasionally added alternate paths. I also enjoyed the UX design. The game used splashes of red to show where you could alter your path or interact with objects. Green often designated places you could hide; red showed places you could climb. Avoiding guards was sometimes very difficult, and combat could be excruciating. But I think what I enjoyed the most were the levels where you had to outrun fires that broke out. It was fun trying to navigate the levels as fast as possible, and even more fun when I unlocked the jump/sliding kill moves.  In my first time through these levels, I almost hit the best speed run score, usually missing it by a few seconds. It felt good to get that close on my first try, making me feel that all those old gaming muscles were still there, waiting to be tapped. (It felt annoying to get that close, but miss.)

There are a lot of controls to remember, and I confess that my play style was a combination of impatience and forgetfulness. When I played Dishonored, I did a stealth run, and didn’t kill anyone. In ACC:C, I got impatient and killed as many guards as I could. I got tired of dealing with them. Maybe if I remembered the combos, I would have done better. I probably would have fared better with a controller, but I was using my PC and was feeling too lazy and disinterested to try to figure it out.

So, I guess that is my final verdict. Good visual and level design, but kind of uninteresting and not very engaging from a plot standpoint. But the speed run sections are a lot of fun.

Final Rating: 6/10

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3 thoughts on “Assassin’s Creed Chronicles: China

  1. I’ve never played Assassins Creed, but like you, I did always like what I saw, and the concept behind the game. I can totally see why you’d start with this, and man, a game set in Edo Japan, that would be fantastic. I love it when they throw a little bit of history in there. I’m also not the most patient person so perhaps this one’s not up my alley, but I’d never say no to trying it if a friend was playing it. Great post by the way, really enjoyed reading it.

    Would you be interested in sharing your thoughts and opinions on our gaming platform, Now Loading? I’d like to invite you to join the platform, and I’d love to hear from you so I can to expand on that. Feel free to shoot me an e-mail, my contact details are on my “About” page. Hopefully talk soon!

    • Thanks for the invite. I’ll check out the site. Unfortunately, I’m not at a place right now that I can do regular updates. Not as much as I’d like, anyway. I don’t have as much time as I’d like to complete games and then write about them. If that changes, I’ll keep you in mind. In the mean time, I’ll add your site to my reading list.

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