Star Wars Episode 2: Attack of the Clones – Spanish Language Dub

Overview

This is part two of my experiment to see if the Spanish Language dub of the Star Wars prequels make these movie more enjoyable. In the previous post, I evaluated The Phantom Menace, and found that I liked the movie better. My problem with the prequels rests more on the dialogue and performances, so I theorized that the Spanish voice actors might do a better job delivering the lines. However, since I don’t speak Spanish, I have to watch the movies with English subtitles. Sometimes bad dialogue is easier to swallow if performed well or read.

So, how did Attack of the Clones hold up?

aotc-bluray
Attack of the Clones blu-ray cover. Copyright Disney and Lucasfilm.

Story:  7

After Senator Amidala narrowly escapes assassination, Obi-Wan and Anakin are assigned protection duty. While Obi-Wan investigates the source of the hit, Anakin guards Amidala as she returns to Naboo for safety. However, Anakin is at the mercy of a growing obsession with Amidala. The two soon fall in love—causing Anakin and Amidala to compromise their professional duties. But before these two can fully sort out their feelings, Obi-Wan’s investigation uncovers a conspiracy that threatens both the Republic and the Jedi Order, and plants the seeds to change both institutions forever.

Let’s start positive. Ewan McGregor is good, and the Obi-Wan plot is interesting. Maybe this is my preference for investigations, but it was fun trying to put the pieces together with Obi-Wan. Unfortunately, he comes across as a bit of an idiot when trying to find Kamino in the Jedi archives. These scenes were a bit of a misstep, but Obi-Wan tracking Jango Fett and discovering the Clone Army propel this movie along. As a long-time Star Wars fan, it was fun to finally learn what the Clone Wars were after their tantalizing mention in A New Hope, something I had wondered about for years. (Along with the Journal of the Whills, which had an interesting name drop in Rogue One).

Now for the bad . . . . The love story does not work. The Spanish language dub cannot save it. By using the English language dialogue, the film fails to salvage this story. The disconnect between the dialogue and the music made this excruciating. The love story between Amidala and Anakin is essential to the prequel story, and it just does not work. I never once believed these characters liked each other, let alone fell in love. In fact, the line delivery in the Spanish dub, when combined with Christiansen and Portman’s performances, almost changed the way I perceived these two characters.

Characters:  5

Anakin is written with no subtlety. The voice actors playing Anakin and Amidala do the best they can, and while their deliver is much better, they are working with horrible dialogue. To make matters worse, Hayden Christiansen chose to play Anakin as obsessive and frustrated while Natalie Portman played Amidala as uncertain and confused. The obsession and frustration combined with his frequent outbursts makes Anakin feel like a sexual predator who is manipulating the woman he is supposed to protect. Amidala never really seems to be in love with him, and so her growing acceptance of their relationship seems almost psychologically abusive. At times, I wondered if Anakin was using the Force to manipulate her. I don’t think this is what George Lucas was going for, and it was incredibly disturbing. For this reason alone, I don’t think I can watch the Spanish dub again. With the lines spoken in English, they come across as bad performances, which is much easier to take.

Themes: 6

I enjoy the recurring conflicts between Jedi, Sith, and Mandalorians in Star Wars. This played out again and again in the Legends stories, and thematically appears here with Jedi, Sith (Sidious and Dooku), and Mandalorians (the clones based of Jango Fett). This is a millennia-long conflict, and the Clone Wars mark the long-sought victory of the Sith and Mandalorians over the Jedi. Although, again, it isn’t quite as simple as the Mandalorians have split into factions, most for peace but one in particular for war. But that isn’t in this movie, and I don’t know how much of these ideas were in Lucas’s mind.

Beyond these themes, I don’t know that there is much to work with here. This movie seems less interested in saying something than paying homage to some of George Lucas’s film influences. Sometimes identifying these influences helps pass the time when the story drags. There is an interesting story underneath all this, a story about the rise of tyranny in times of threat and uncertainty. There is something brilliant about storytelling deep, deep beneath this. Unfortunately, I sometimes think this is more fan theory and wishful thinking than something that is actually on the screen. As with The Phantom Menace, I appreciate this film more and more as I think about it. And I will continue to do so as long as watch it as little as possible.

Presentation: 6

The cinemagraphy in this movie is good. Just look at these shots.

Anakin on Naboo, morning.
Attack of the Clones cinematography. Copyright Disney and Lucasfilm.
Anakin questions Jawa
Attack of the Clones cinematography. Copyright Disney and Lucasfilm.
Amidala embraces Anakin, Tatooine
Attack of the Clones cinematography. Copyright Disney and Lucasfilm.

Additionally, Lucas pays homage to a lot of influences in this movie. First up is Christopher Lee, which makes a nice bookend with fellow Hammer Horror alum Peter Cushing.

Count Dooku talks to Sidious
Attack of the Clones cinematography. Copyright Disney and Lucasfilm.

Then, of course, there is Jango (Django) Fett, which brings in a bit of the Western vibe (which The Clone Wars explores further in “Death Trap” episode.

Boba Fett mourns his father
Attack of the Clones cinematography. Copyright Disney and Lucasfilm.

The Geonosian arena feels very Edgar Rice Burroughs.

Geonosis Arena
Attack of the Clones cinematography. Copyright Disney and Lucasfilm.

We get a bit of a Blade Runner tinged Noir with the neon lights of Coruscant.

assassin-coruscant
Attack of the Clones cinematography. Copyright Disney and Lucasfilm.

And some of the battle scenes at the end of the film have a war documentary feel.

Clone Army
Attack of the Clones cinematography. Copyright Disney and Lucasfilm.

Certainly, few films look like this. Few films look this diverse. Lucas is really flexing his visual presentation muscles here. It’s just a shame that the character moments and pacing aren’t as developed in this film. Maybe that’s not fair. I’ve definitely seen worse, but it feels bad because I think he was close to making it work.

Personal Enjoyment: 4

The Spanish dub of The Phantom Menace went from annoying to watchable. The Spanish dub of Attack of the Clones didn’t provide much in way of improvements. This romance in this movie still doesn’t work, not because of the performances, but because of the script. The love story is essential to Anakin’s turn to the Dark Side, but at no point did I believe these two characters fell in love.

The movie also felt too long. The imprisonment and showdown on Geonosis takes over an hour! Often, pacing issues and length are more a consequence of not engaging with the movie, and that was definitely present here. I wanted to give up when I saw I still had an hour left and this was after having to slog through every scene with Anakin and Amidala, watching poorly written dialogue be delivered as best possible by two actors who had no chemistry or experience delivering lines this bad. It is because of this movie that the Machete Order doesn’t work for me. The movie looks good, there are interesting homages with the camera work, and Obi-Wan’s investigation is interesting. Everything else falls flat. I want to be positive. I want  to say the Spanish language dub covers a multitude of problems. But I can’t. Maybe with a different script, something could be salvaged. With the current script, though, it just doesn’t work.

Perhaps one day I will see what R. A. Salvatore did with the novelization. Until then, Attack of the Clones goes on the Rifftrax shelf.

Final Rating: 5.6/10

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