Star Wars Legends: Into the Void (Dawn of the Jedi)

Overview

Into the Void by Tim Lebbon is the first and only novel in the Dawn of the Jedi series. This series explored the ancient, pre-Republic history of the Jedi—or, as they were known 25,000 years before A New Hope, the Je’daii. This novel was tied to a comic series of the same name.

There are a lot of really great ideas in this series, but it looks like a full exploration of this era ended prematurely since this was added to the Extended Universe very late and became a casualty of the Disney cannon wipe. I’m not sure how much of this era was planned at the time, but Into the Void and the Dawn of the Jedi comics were a promising start.

Dawn Of The Jedi Into The Void Cover

Characters:  8

Into the Void primarily follows Lanoree Brock, a Je’daii Ranger who has been given the mission to track down her brother Dal before he activates a device that might destroy the Tython system. Dal was believed to be dead, killed during the Great Journey that all Force-sensitives on Tython must take before becoming Je’daii. Dal had rejected the Je’daii teaching and wanted to rely on his own abilities. He wanted to seek knowledge in the stars, not in the Force. Lanoree’s mission, then, is not just to stop a possible madman from initiating destruction; it is a mission to come to terms with her own feelings of failure. She blamed herself in part for Dal’s rejection of Je’daii teachings and for his supposed death.

Joining her on this mission is Tre Sana, a shady Twi’lek that had been genetically modified by Lanoree’s master Dam-Powl. This modification was accomplished through the Force. The two make a good team, with Lanoree’s deadly stoicism being a good foil to Tre’s Star-Wars-roguish attitude. However, both characters are dealing with great pain. Lanoree keeps her pain inside; Tre hides his pain through jokes and charm.

Since much of the novel is from Lanoree’s perspective (though not a first-person perspective), we mainly get her impressions of Dal. On the surface, he appears to be yet another sci-fi madman, but when you dig deeper into the lore of Dawn of the Jedi, there is actually a plausible motive behind his actions. Because of this, I would actually recommend reading the Dawn of the Jedi: Force Storm comic by John Ostrander and Jan Duursema before reading Into the Void. It provides some important backstory to the origin of the Je’daii and the settlers on the planet Tython. Chronologically, this novel takes place just before (and concurrent) with Force Storm, but the exposition from issue #1 is essential. It makes Dal’s motives a bit more clear, though his actions are still irresponsible and malicious.

Story:  8

If you are looking for a fast-paced, action/adventure, Into the Void is going to disappoint. While there are action scenes, the main focus of this story (to me) is to flesh out the Je’daii culture and explore this small pocket of the Star Wars galaxy. The novel moves back and forth between Lanoree’s search for Dal and her memories of the Great Journey that she and Dal took together. Along with this are insights into ancient Je’daii teachings and philosophies—ones that are both familiar but distinctly different. More on this later.

The story takes its time, and much of that time is spent in exploration. I appreciated this, and it made the book easy to pick up right where I left off after putting it down for a month. It wasn’t gripping, but it wasn’t off-putting. I enjoyed working through this novel leisurely, almost like I was on a journey with the characters.

Vision: 9

What was it trying to do?

Into the Void attempted to expand on the already vast Star Wars lore by looking at the ancient Je’daii. It attempted to create something new, yet familiar; fresh, yet plausibly ancient.

Was it successful in doing it?

For me, it succeeded.

Would I like to see elements of this added to the New Canon?

Absolutely.

Personal Enjoyment: 8

This novel surprised me because I put it down for a month, and I thought I wouldn’t come back to it. But after time passed, I missed it and wanted to return to Lanoree, Tre, and the ancient Je’daii. So, while there was no sense of urgency, the book was a journey for me. Sometimes one has to pause in a journey to let things settle, but the journey must always continue. Seeing this book as a journey was fitting as it was largely about Lanoree’s journey, both as a Padawan and as a Je’daii overcoming the guilt of her past.

But I also enjoyed the exploration of the ancient Je’daii. I mentioned earlier that the teachings and philosophies were both familiar but different. This is pre-Jedi and pre-Sith philosophy. The light and the dark are held at balance in the individual. Sometimes a Je’daii must call on the dark, and sometimes the light. The struggle is to maintain one’s balance in this use of the Force. The light and the dark are visibly represented in the moons of Tython: Ashla and Bogan. Ashla is a light moon, Bogan a dark one. When the orbits are balanced, the Tython climate is peaceful and pleasant, but when the moons are unbalanced, terrible storms and earthquakes rage. This environmental and astronomical reality informs the Je’daii understanding of the Force that exists within the individual. I think this rhetro-evolution of the ideas of the Force, Light, and Dark are a fascinating exploration of the evolution of ideas over time. These ideas passed through centuries in the Star Wars galaxy, eventually becoming the ideas of Light Side, Dark Side, balance, peace, and passion that we are familiar with in the Imperial/Rebellion era. These ideas are what kept me thinking about this novel and what kept me coming back.

This series is, I think, one of the unfortunate casualties of the cannon-purge. I would love to see more of Lanoree and the ancient Je’daii.

Style/Craft: 9

Lebbon did a good job of finding the characters in the massive amount of world-building this novel required. The characters felt consistent, and the novel was easy to follow. The pace was slow, but I think it was necessary to what he was trying to do. Even though I haven’t read anything else by Lebbon, it looks like he writes a lot of horror, and a command of pace is essential for that genre. I wouldn’t mind seeing Lebbon return to the Star Wars fold.

Final Rating: 8.4/10

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