Star Wars Legends: Knights of the Old Republic

Overview

Knights of the Old Republic was the first Star Wars CRPG. (Or should it be XBRPG since it was first released on the Xbox?) Released in 2003, the game has become very highly regarded among fans. I recently played through the game for the first time, although I was already familiar with parts of the story, so the big twist wasn’t a surprise. There will be spoilers in this review since the game is over a decade old and no longer (at the moment) in official Star Wars canon.

Knights of the Old Republic box art

Characters:  9

In general, Bioware tends to create good characters. And while I didn’t spend a lot of time pursuing character quests, I did take time to talk to the characters between missions. Each has an interesting back story and each has a distinct personality. I kept getting into arguments with Carth, but over time it was apparent that Carth’s outlook came from a place of personal betrayal. I enjoyed helping Carth reunite with his son, even though it was a bittersweet reunion. I applaud Bioware for putting this much detail into character interactions. I think the only issue I have with characterization is Bastilla. I don’t feel like we got enough to make her sudden turn to the Dark Side believable. The turn seemed more plot-driven than character driven. On some level, we needed her to be a Revan counterpart in the present, for her to personally experience the path Revan walked. She needed to see how evil can come from good depending on the choices made. Maybe different dialogue would have made her turn more believable, but I just didn’t see enough darkness in her.

And of course, HK-47 as a bloodthirsty but well-spoken droid is a ton of fun.

But I can’t discuss character without addressing Revan. Bioware pulled this off quite well. Since the major reveal is that you play as Darth Revan post-mind-wipe, much of Revan’s backstory has to be vague. We need just enough details to see who he was before, but not so much that the backstory alters the player experience. The game takes you through locations in Revan’s past and gives ideas about some of his past actions, but leaves you to fill in the motivations. Revan can truly be whoever you want him or her to be, and the story still works. Creating a story that is so dependent on a character that has this much flexibility (or lack of characterization) is an interesting challenge and achievement.

Story:  9

Possibly more so than with characters, KotOR really shines when it comes to the story. This should be no surprise as it is a Bioware game. On the one hand, you play a new Jedi searching for pieces of a star map to lead you to the Star Forge, a mysterious object that Revan and Malak used to lead the Sith Empire to war with the Jedi. But in addition to this McGuffin quest, you are on a journey of self-discovery. You are putting together pieces of your character’s past. You just don’t realize that at the time.

This story also greatly expands the lore of Star Wars by showing what happened after Exar Kun and Ulic qel Droma’s defeat in The Sith War comics. In those comics, Ulic became the leader of the Mandalorian army. Without his leadership, and with the subsequent defeat of Mandalore, a new Mandalore rose and led his army against the Republic. This new leader had great success where Ulic and the previous Mandalore failed. The Jedi tried to stay out of the war, but the Republic was suffering defeat after defeat. Eventually, a group of Jedi led by Revan and Malak violated the Jedi Council’s wishes, and went to war alongside the Republic. They defeated the Mandalorians, but Revan and Malak vanished into the Outer Rim. They returned later as Lords of the Sith and went to war against the Jedi. The game opens shortly after a major Republic victory in which Revan was defeated. Yes, all that was just the backstory. In addition to the immediate history, we learn more ancient history of the galaxy: ancient Tatooine from Tusken mythology and the rise and downfall of the Eternal Empire of the Rakatan, both of which were later expanded on in the Dawn of the Jedi comics.

In the end, KotOR is a story about identity and redemption that takes place on an epic, galactic scale. It expands the Star Wars lore into some compelling new areas that later writers were able to explore.

Vision: 8

What was it trying to do?

KotOR was an attempt to create in game form a Star Wars experience with all the epic conflict and twists of the movies.

Was it successful in doing it?

For the most part, yes. As far as story and characters are concerned, I would say yes.

Would I like to see elements of this added to the New Canon?

Absolutely. I would like to see anything from the Old Republic era make its way to the new canon. The ancient conflict between the Jedi and Sith are more fully explored in this era, and there really isn’t anything here that would conflict with the current movies and novels. That may change in time, but for now it can stay firmly in head-canon. In fact, Revan came very close to being canon via The Clone Wars. He was cut at the last minute, but character designs had been made. I guess there’s always hope for him to be reference in Rebels.

Gameplay: 6

Okay, here’s where things get a bit more critical. I’m somewhere between a casual and serious gamer. I’m not going to dock this game for graphics just because I don’t think graphics are necessarily a huge thing when it comes to story and gameplay. They can enhance, but it is how you use what you have. If they get in the way, then it is an issue, but I don’t really think they graphics affected the game one way or another. However, KotOR was initially an Xbox release. I know graphics at the time were capable of better. That was the era of Final Fantasy X and XII (I was more of a Playstation 2 guy at the time). The graphics of those games hold up better; KotOR does not. It looks old, which is why some fans are recreating the game with the Unreal 4 engine.

But again, I’m leaving graphics out of the gameplay rating. For me KotOR suffers on two fronts: level design and combat. The level design is incredibly dull. Taris was probably the worst, and I constantly had to look at the map because everything looked the same. Kashyyk and Manan were better, but the uninteresting design actually made me not want to do side quests because I just wanted to get on to the next planet or next area. When things didn’t improve for me after Dantooine, I just decided to do a story run, not a completion run. When the level design breaks immersion or makes you want to skip things, there is a problem.

The second issue I had with the game was combat. I don’t mind turn-based menus. I grew up with Final Fantasy, after all, but the combat in this game just didn’t interest me. It got better after I got a lightsaber and figured out where to spend my attribute points. But there isn’t really much variety here. Part of the problem is I started playing The Old Republic first, which has a bit of variety with special moves. Even though there isn’t much to that system, the animations are interesting. And the later Bioware title Dragon Age: Origin was complex enough for me to have to monitor all my teammates even though they had tactical conditions set up. I guess I can say those later Bioware games improved on what was started in KotOR (or the earlier Forgotten Realms games), but an elegant battle system hadn’t emerged here yet.

Also, different character builds just didn’t seem effective. Most of the team characters can do stealth, tank, science, etc. better. As a result, making your character anything other than a fighter seemed pointless. Unfortunately, I figured this out late in the game and didn’t want to start with a new character build. So, I started allocating points differently. Then I discovered the level cap! So while the game story allows you freedom to create a character background in your head, the game mechanics are a bit more restrictive.

Oh, and one final thing. The menus are not very elegant. I think I stopped reading data pads early in the game because the text window for the contents was too small.

Personal Enjoyment: 6

Yeah, this was going to be low after the previous category.

It is hard to experience something out of its time. Take classic Doctor Who, for example. Anyone coming to the show having watched new Who can’t experience the show the same way original viewers did. They can’t experience the surprise of Steven and Vicki stumbling into another Time Lord’s TARDIS for the first time in The Time Meddler. We can’t know what it was like to see the Time Lords show up in all their mystical power in The War Games. New Doctor Who has firmly placed a lens of interpretation that changes how fans experience that old show.

Similarly, I can’t experience Knights of the Old Republic as it was at the time. I can’t remove conceptions of gameplay, level design, and mechanics from my experience of the game. I can try to give the game as fair a trial as possible, emphasizing character, story, and vision, but personal experience is still part of the review process, and this game was disappointing to me. Maybe the mystique created by the passion of the fans made my expectations too high. Sometimes art resonates with us better at some points of our lives than others, and maybe I played the game at the wrong time. I wanted to like the game, and I may well play it again one day, but for now, I come away disappointed.

But my experience is not everyone’s experience. And I really like my current rating system because I try to give more weight to artistic craft than personal enjoyment. Knights of the Old Republic takes a hit on enjoyment and gameplay, but the achievements with story and character make up for negatives.

Final Rating: 7.6/10

Star Wars Legends: Into the Void (Dawn of the Jedi)

Overview

Into the Void by Tim Lebbon is the first and only novel in the Dawn of the Jedi series. This series explored the ancient, pre-Republic history of the Jedi—or, as they were known 25,000 years before A New Hope, the Je’daii. This novel was tied to a comic series of the same name.

There are a lot of really great ideas in this series, but it looks like a full exploration of this era ended prematurely since this was added to the Extended Universe very late and became a casualty of the Disney cannon wipe. I’m not sure how much of this era was planned at the time, but Into the Void and the Dawn of the Jedi comics were a promising start.

Dawn Of The Jedi Into The Void Cover

Characters:  8

Into the Void primarily follows Lanoree Brock, a Je’daii Ranger who has been given the mission to track down her brother Dal before he activates a device that might destroy the Tython system. Dal was believed to be dead, killed during the Great Journey that all Force-sensitives on Tython must take before becoming Je’daii. Dal had rejected the Je’daii teaching and wanted to rely on his own abilities. He wanted to seek knowledge in the stars, not in the Force. Lanoree’s mission, then, is not just to stop a possible madman from initiating destruction; it is a mission to come to terms with her own feelings of failure. She blamed herself in part for Dal’s rejection of Je’daii teachings and for his supposed death.

Joining her on this mission is Tre Sana, a shady Twi’lek that had been genetically modified by Lanoree’s master Dam-Powl. This modification was accomplished through the Force. The two make a good team, with Lanoree’s deadly stoicism being a good foil to Tre’s Star-Wars-roguish attitude. However, both characters are dealing with great pain. Lanoree keeps her pain inside; Tre hides his pain through jokes and charm.

Since much of the novel is from Lanoree’s perspective (though not a first-person perspective), we mainly get her impressions of Dal. On the surface, he appears to be yet another sci-fi madman, but when you dig deeper into the lore of Dawn of the Jedi, there is actually a plausible motive behind his actions. Because of this, I would actually recommend reading the Dawn of the Jedi: Force Storm comic by John Ostrander and Jan Duursema before reading Into the Void. It provides some important backstory to the origin of the Je’daii and the settlers on the planet Tython. Chronologically, this novel takes place just before (and concurrent) with Force Storm, but the exposition from issue #1 is essential. It makes Dal’s motives a bit more clear, though his actions are still irresponsible and malicious.

Story:  8

If you are looking for a fast-paced, action/adventure, Into the Void is going to disappoint. While there are action scenes, the main focus of this story (to me) is to flesh out the Je’daii culture and explore this small pocket of the Star Wars galaxy. The novel moves back and forth between Lanoree’s search for Dal and her memories of the Great Journey that she and Dal took together. Along with this are insights into ancient Je’daii teachings and philosophies—ones that are both familiar but distinctly different. More on this later.

The story takes its time, and much of that time is spent in exploration. I appreciated this, and it made the book easy to pick up right where I left off after putting it down for a month. It wasn’t gripping, but it wasn’t off-putting. I enjoyed working through this novel leisurely, almost like I was on a journey with the characters.

Vision: 9

What was it trying to do?

Into the Void attempted to expand on the already vast Star Wars lore by looking at the ancient Je’daii. It attempted to create something new, yet familiar; fresh, yet plausibly ancient.

Was it successful in doing it?

For me, it succeeded.

Would I like to see elements of this added to the New Canon?

Absolutely.

Personal Enjoyment: 8

This novel surprised me because I put it down for a month, and I thought I wouldn’t come back to it. But after time passed, I missed it and wanted to return to Lanoree, Tre, and the ancient Je’daii. So, while there was no sense of urgency, the book was a journey for me. Sometimes one has to pause in a journey to let things settle, but the journey must always continue. Seeing this book as a journey was fitting as it was largely about Lanoree’s journey, both as a Padawan and as a Je’daii overcoming the guilt of her past.

But I also enjoyed the exploration of the ancient Je’daii. I mentioned earlier that the teachings and philosophies were both familiar but different. This is pre-Jedi and pre-Sith philosophy. The light and the dark are held at balance in the individual. Sometimes a Je’daii must call on the dark, and sometimes the light. The struggle is to maintain one’s balance in this use of the Force. The light and the dark are visibly represented in the moons of Tython: Ashla and Bogan. Ashla is a light moon, Bogan a dark one. When the orbits are balanced, the Tython climate is peaceful and pleasant, but when the moons are unbalanced, terrible storms and earthquakes rage. This environmental and astronomical reality informs the Je’daii understanding of the Force that exists within the individual. I think this rhetro-evolution of the ideas of the Force, Light, and Dark are a fascinating exploration of the evolution of ideas over time. These ideas passed through centuries in the Star Wars galaxy, eventually becoming the ideas of Light Side, Dark Side, balance, peace, and passion that we are familiar with in the Imperial/Rebellion era. These ideas are what kept me thinking about this novel and what kept me coming back.

This series is, I think, one of the unfortunate casualties of the cannon-purge. I would love to see more of Lanoree and the ancient Je’daii.

Style/Craft: 9

Lebbon did a good job of finding the characters in the massive amount of world-building this novel required. The characters felt consistent, and the novel was easy to follow. The pace was slow, but I think it was necessary to what he was trying to do. Even though I haven’t read anything else by Lebbon, it looks like he writes a lot of horror, and a command of pace is essential for that genre. I wouldn’t mind seeing Lebbon return to the Star Wars fold.

Final Rating: 8.4/10