New Look for a New Phase

Since I completed the classic Doctor Who project I have been tinkering and revamping the site. While I plan on continuing my Doctor Who focus by reading through The New Adventures, listening to Big Finish productions, and working my way toward the 2005 series, I will be widening the focus a bit. I want this site to be more representative of me as a writer and a critic and not just me as a Doctor Who fan. Yes, the Doctor Who content will continue (as is implied by the current header), but I want to keep my attention fresh and sharp. I tend to burn out when I focus on one thing to the exclusion of others. It is part of the curse of having an INTP personality type.

The obvious changes are the appearance and the use of a static front page. I want the front page to direct readers to work that I am proud of rather than whatever the current blog post is, which may or may not be my best writing. No one nails it every writing session, and sometimes I need to produce content as a cleansing ritual.

Over the next few weeks I will be updating the site’s menu system and individual web pages. I am eager for thoughts, suggestions, and general feedback if you feel so compelled.

The summer looks like a great time for writing. A new adventure awaits.

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Doctor Who: The New Adventures Series 1.01 – Timewyrm: Genesys

cover for timewyrm: genesys

Where to Find It?

As usual, Bookfinder.com is a great resource.

A detailed synopsis can be found at the Doctor Who Reference Guide.

Story By

John Peel

Book Copy

Mesopotamia – the cradle of civilization. In the fertile crescent of land on the banks of the rivers Tigris and Euphrates, mankind is turning from hunter gatherer into farmer, and from farmer into city-dweller.

Gilgamesh, the first hero-king, rules the city of Urak. An equally legendary figure arrives, in a police telephone box: the TARDIS has brought the Doctor and his companion Ace to witness the first steps of mankind’s long progress to the stars.

And from somewhere amid those distant points of light an evil sentience has tumbled. To her followers in the city of Kish she is known as Ishtar the goddess; to the Doctor’s forebears on ancient Gallifrey she was a mythical terror – the Timewyrm.


 

I just sometimes wonder what I’m doing with my life . . . . following the Doctor all over the place

“Okay, what’s this whole “New Adventures Series 1” business?” you may be asking. Well, back when I rediscovered Doctor Who—the first time I was in college—I frequented the Outpost Gallifrey website. The “Canon Keeper’s Guide to Doctor Who” was a semi-mythical document to me. It was the key to long-lost memories and the promise of future entertainment. It made me wonder about this show that I connected to my mythical golden age—my childhood—a time when I had no responsibilities, no cares, no finals, and no research papers. This guide divided the New Adventures into seasons, and I still think of Doctor Who in this way. Yes, the television series is organized according to season/series but to the best of my knowledge the books were never officially viewed this way. But it’s fun nonetheless. I even try to sort Big Finish releases by series, something that is easier now than it used to be.

So according to this model, Timewyrm: Genesys is the pilot to this new series of stories. It has the unenviable position of linking what came before on television to what is yet to be written in novels. It is by no means a bad novel, and it is quite readable but, by a similar token, quite forgettable. And as I mentioned previously, this novel follows the standard Doctor Who trope of alien attempting to conquer humanity during a historical period. Although, this historical time period is actually mythic time, so it takes the ancient space alien route of mythology as extraterrestrial. We get the “real” story behind Gilgamesh before it was altered and polished up by Avram the minstrel. And the twist at the end, the identity of the long-promised Timewyrm, is actually fairly predictable.

It is an interesting place to start and it is quite clunky in places, especially where it tries to refer back to events from the show. The introduction of the Doctor and Ace is particularly strange as it seems to try to introduce new readers to the characters while dropping in-jokes to fans of the show. Until the ancient Mesopotamia story gets going, the novel is slow reading.

By the end of the book I realized I didn’t have much more to add from my previous post. The supporting characters were not very engaging. But as with most pilot episodes, this series is still trying to find its voice, still trying to figure itself out. Next we will see what Terrance Dicks brings to the table.