Doctor Who: A Big Hand for the Doctor

Cover image for A Big Hand for The Doctor.
Source: Eoin Colfer web site. Copyright 2013 by Puffin.

Who Wrote It: Eoin Colfer

Official Blurb (from Amazon): Eleven Doctors, eleven stories: a year-long celebration of Doctor Who! The most exciting names in children’s fiction each create their own unique adventure about the time-travelling Time Lord.

London, 1900. The First Doctor is missing both his hand and his granddaughter, Susan. Faced with the search for Susan, a strange beam of soporific light, and a host of marauding Soul Pirates intent on harvesting human limbs, the Doctor is promised a dangerous journey into a land he may never forget . . . .

First Line: “The Doctor was not happy with his new bio-hybrid hand.”

A Big Hand for The Doctor isn’t so much a book as a short story with chapters. It draws heavily from Peter Pan and even drives that point home in the epilogue. And while I don’t know that I would say Colfer captured the feel and tone of the First Doctor era, I do think he captured a quasi-Target novelization feel. In fact, Colfer admits that he came to Doctor Who through the Target books. So it is actually quite fitting that he write a Doctor Who book for younger readers.

The Hartnell Doctor is one of my favorites. I’m actually quite critical of portrayals. I don’t know that Colfer completely nails it, but at the same time, I can just about imagine the Doctor of this story hasn’t yet become the darker, more suspicious figure that we meet in An Unearthly Child. Colfer’s Doctor is one who is safer for the kids—maybe The Doctor from the third season rather than the first–but still a bit grumpy.

Typically, I don’t enjoy stories that are set prior to An Unearthly Child. These stories tend to have too much awareness that they are pre-series. The only one I have enjoyed is Quinnis, but then Marc Platt writes the First Doctor and Susan quite well. But with A Big Hand for The Doctor, I’m actually willing to cut Colfer some slack because he isn’t making a big deal about the pre-series setting. We aren’t in 1960s England, tied to Foreman’s Yard and Coal Hill. We are in the early 1900s, and The Doctor is fighting space pirates who steal the souls of children. And I can just about see the First Doctor risking his neck to protect children from evil creatures such as these because I think William Hartnell would improve.

And that’s the bottom line for me. A Big Hand for the Doctor may not reflect the 1960s stories as they aired, but it reflects something I think William Hartnell would have liked: a protective, time-travelling grandfather. Isn’t that kinda what the First Doctor is, after all?

Final Verdict: Unpretentious and not weighed down with gravitas. A Big Hand for the Doctor is a quick read and a nice little tribute to Doctor Who as seen through the Target books. At just under $3, it is well worth the price.

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